• 2012-06-18 21:48:00
    Hilton Hotel (Logan Airport)
    42.367400°N 71.023172°W 1 Hotel Dr Logan International Airport (BOS) Boston, MA 02128

    Hotels, bed and breakfasts, hostels, and lodges

    Size or type of room: Double with 2 king-size beds
    Price: $199
    Rating: 3

    Comment: It was expensive and the room was small.

    Date: 6/18/2012
    Address: One Hotel Dr.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02128
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-18 22:58:00
    La Summa Restaurant
    42.364583°N 71.052558°W 30 Fleet St Boston, MA 02113

    Restaurant

    Food ordered: Pollo parmigiana with a side of ziti.
    Price: $17.95
    Rating: 4

    Comment: It was a bit expensive but quite good. The restaurant is located in Little Italy, North End, Boston.

    Date: 6/18/2012
    Address: 30 Fleet St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02113
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-19 17:24:00
    Cape Cod Glacial Deposits
    41.533731°N 70.668372°W

    Interesting geological sites

    Summary: Cape Cod was formed directly by deposits from glaciers or those from streams and lakes formed from glaciers approximately 23,000 years ago.

    Description: Cap Cod was formed from till pushed in front of the glaciers and deposited as terminal moraines. Cape Cod represents the furthest extent of glaciation during the last glacial period some 23,000 years ago (Laurentide glacier). The deposits on Cape Cod not only represent moraines but also outwash plains formed from rivers flowing from the melting glaciers. The moraines consist of poorly sorted material (till) ranging from large boulders to fine rock powder whereas the stream deposits on the outwash plain are sorted (written by Jack Crane).

    Further reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Cod

  • 2012-06-19 18:08:00
    Pie in the Sky Bakery and Cafe
    41.523397°N 70.668817°W 16 Water St Woods Hole, MA 02543

    Restaurant

    Food ordered: Cup of clam chowder.
    Price: $3.5
    Rating: 4

    Comment: Reasonable prices and good food. They also have some delicious bakery items.

    Date: 6/19/2012
    Address: 10 Water St.
    City: Woods Hole
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02543
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-19 18:55:00
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    41.525264°N 70.671839°W

    Schools, Colleges, Universities, and Research Centers

    Summary: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is part of the Woods Hole Research Center and was established in 1930. It focuses research on urgent environmental issues. It includes the Marine Biology Laboratory and National Marine Fisheries Service.

    Description: The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is located in the village of Woods Hole and is part of the Woods Hole Research Center with several campuses. It is the world’s largest non-profit and private oceanographic institute. The Rockefeller Foundation ceded the institution with the requisite start-up money and the Institute was established in 1930. The Institute is probably most noted by the public for its discovery and subsequent mapping of the RMS Titanic and its deep diving submersible the Alvin, which is stored here (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.whoi.edu/

  • 2012-06-19 19:16:00
    Nobska Lighthouse
    41.515803°N 70.655108°W 170 Church St Woods Hole, MA 02543

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Nobska Lighthouse was first constructed in 1828 by the Federal Government with the light directly above the keeper’s home. In 1876, the lighthouse was reconstructed as a 42-foot (12.2 m) tower (written by Jack Crane).

  • 2012-06-20 16:25:00
    Plymouth Plantation Living Museum
    41.937536°N 70.626017°W Plimoth Plantation Access Plymouth, MA 02360

    Museum

    Summary: Plymouth Plantation is considered a living museum where staff (actors) become real historical figures from the original Plymouth Plantation established in 1627 (the museum is not the original site of the settlement).

    Description: The staff not only speaks in the first person and dresses as the original pilgrims, but they become specific characters from the period. They also raise the crops and farm animals that might have been raised by the pilgrims in an effort to recreate the atmosphere that existed in the community in 1627. You might run into Miles Standish or his wife and discuss the current difficulties they have had raising corn for example.

    The museum was started in 1947 by Henry Hornblower II, a amateur archaeologist. Next to the museum is a recreation of a Native American site of the Wampanoag Tribe. The site is staffed with descendents of Native Americans from several nations dressed in their native clothing (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plimoth_Plantation

  • 2012-06-20 19:20:00
    Mayflower II Museum
    41.959736°N 70.662203°W 85 Water St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Museums

    Summary: The Mayflower II was built as an accurate replica of the original Mayflower that brought the pilgrims to Plymouth in 1620.

    Description: The Mayflower II was built in England in 1954 through collaboration between Plymouth Plantation Living Museum and Warwick Charlton. It sailed across the Atlantic in 1957.
    There are staff on the boat that impersonate pilgrims and sailors that came across on the original Mayflower. They speak in the first person and dress and speak as those that lived in 1620 (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayflower_II

  • 2012-06-20 19:39:00
    Mayflower Anchored Approximately Here
    41.974089°N 70.657647°W

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Dec. 15, 1620 - the Mayflower moved from Provincetown Harbor to Plymouth Harbor and anchored approximately here. Philbrick states: "Both Plymouth Harbor and Duxbury Bay to the north are contained within two interlocking sickles of sand: the Gurnet, an extension of Duxbury Beach to the north and Long Beach to the south [looks like a spit]. The Mayflower anchored just within the Goose point at the end of Long Beach, a mile and a half from Plymouth Rock."


    Apr. 5, 1621 - the Mayflower returned to England never to return (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-20 19:50:00
    Plymouth Rock
    41.958056°N 70.662106°W

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Plymouth Rock is supposedly the place where the pilgrims first stepped foot on America. Unfortunately, there is no mention of landing on a rock at Plymouth by any of those that lived in Plymouth Colony and later wrote of their experiences. However, it has come to be a symbol of the founding of Plymouth Colony and settlement in America.

    Description: Puritans (which later became the Congregational Church) along with English wishing to settle in America, collectively termed the pilgrims, sailed on the Mayflower and landed in what is now Plymouth, MA, on November 20, 1620. Realizing that they were from diverse backgrounds, the pilgrims signed the Mayflower Compact which was used to govern the colony. The pilgrims established a community near Plymouth Rock on nearby Cole’s Hill and along Leyden St. up to Fort Hill during the first years of the settlement (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-20 19:53:00
    Cole’s Hill
    41.957897°N 70.662447°W

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Cole’s Hill was chosen as the site of the first living quarters by the pilgrims when they landed in what is now Plymouth, MA.

    Description: The pilgrims chose Cole’s Hill for several reasons including the fact that they found it cleared but with no Indian structures. Historians believe that the plague (probably bubonic) had killed up to 90% of the Native American population prior to the pilgrims arrival (probably from earlier exploring expeditions from Europe) which may explain why the land had been cleared but no one lived on it. The pilgrims completed their first structure on Christmas day, 1620 (written by Jack Crane).

    Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-20 19:57:00
    Cole’s Hill Burial Ground
    41.957333°N 70.662447°W Carver St., Plymouth, MA 02360

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Summary: Of the 102 pilgrims that arrived on the Mayflower in 1620, by spring of 1621, 52 had died. For safety, the pilgrims hid the bodies during the winter on Cole’s Hill so the Native Americans would not know how high the pilgrim loses were. When the rains came in the spring, some of the bodies washed out and consequently the pilgrims decided to dig up all the bodies and place them in a sarcophagus. A large monument sarcophagus now marks their remains.

    Description: John Carver, the original pilgrim leader, is buried among the remains in the sarcophagus. The inscription on the monument reads: “Here under cover of darkness the fast dwindling company laid their dead, leveling the earth above them lest the Indians should learn how many were their graves. Reader, history records no nobler venture for faith and freedom than that of this pilgrim band. In weariness and painfulness in watchings often in hunger and cold, they laid the foundations of a state wherein every man through countless ages should have liberty to worship God in his own way. May their example inspire thee to do thy part in perpetuating and spreading the lofty ideals of our Republic throughout the world.”

    Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

    Address: Carver St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 20:01:00
    John Carver Grave
    41.957314°N 70.662453°W Carver St., Plymouth, MA 02360

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Cole’s Hill Burial Ground
    Born: 1576, England
    Died: April, 1621, Plymouth, MA

    Comment: John Carver was a wealthy man who organized the Mayflower voyage. He became the first leader of the pilgrims and Governor of Plymouth Colony. He managed to establish a peace treaty with sachem Massasoit before he died of disease in April, 1621.

    For further reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.
    Address: Carver St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 20:02:00
    Leyden St. and Plymouth Settlement
    41.956319°N 70.662883°W Leydenr St Plymouth, Massachusetts

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Modern day Leyden St. is where the pilgrims built 7 of the original Plymouth Colony homes along with 4 other common buildings in early 1621.

    Description: In December 1620, about a month after they left the Mayflower, the pilgrims decided to build 19 homes for their Plymouth settlement. But the deaths of 52 of the original 102 pilgrims that sailed on the Mayflower over the winter limited the pilgrims to building 7 homes from the base of Fort Hill to approximately where Cole’s Hill ends along what is now Leyden St. in Plymouth, MA.

    On Mar. 22, 1621, through the help of translations by Squanto, Governor John Carver negotiated a treaty with sachem Massasoit. Although Massasoit had many more warriors than there were pilgrim fighting men, Massasoit saw the treaty as an allegiance against other enemy tribes. Certainly the pilgrims gun powder and cannons played a major role in the treaty. It is also believed that Squanto misinterpreted what the pilgrims were attempting to convey to Massasoit by telling him that the pilgrims kept the plague, which had decimated the Native American tribes throughout New England, buried in graves. The incorrect translation noticeably upset Massasoit (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-20 20:32:00
    Burial Hill
    41.955656°N 70.666067°W School St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Comment: The first pilgrim burial ground is at Cole’s Hill. But Fort Hill (now called Burial Hill) is the second burial ground of the pilgrims dating back to the 1620s. The oldest headstones were made of wood and no longer exist, but the grave site locations have been preserved. Several notable people are buried here:

    Mary Allerton, pilgrim, last surviving passenger
    William Bradford, pilgrim, second Governor of the Plymouth Colony
    John Howland, pilgrim
    William Brewster, pilgrim, Puritan Church Elder
    Squanto, Patuxet guide and interpreter (unmarked grave)

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.
    Address: School St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 20:40:00
    Major William Bradford Grave
    41.955864°N 70.665894°W 17 m School St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Burial Hill
    Born: March 19, 1590, Austerfield, England
    Died: May 9, 1657, Plymouth, MA

    Comment: Major William Bradford became the second governor of Plymouth Colony in 1621 and was one of 102 pilgrims to sail on the Mayflower in 1620. He replaced John Carver as governor when he died of disease within months of arriving at Plymouth, MA. Bradford continued to govern the colony for 30 years. Bradford was also governor of Plymouth during what was later referred to as the first Thanksgiving.

    William Bradford was born in Austerfield, Yorkshire, England. He became a Puritan (what has now become the Congregational Church) early in his life and moved to Netherlands after King James I cracked down on separatist congregations. The Puritans raised money for the Mayflower in order to begin a colony in America to avoid continued persecution in England. Bradford was one of several Puritans that left England and Netherlands for the New World in 1620.

    His gravestone states: “H I William Bradford of Austerfield Yorkshire England. Was the son of William and Alice Bradford He was Governor of Plymouth Calony from 1621 to 1633, 1635, 1637, 1639 to 1643, 1645 to 1657 On the north side is a Hebrew sentence, said to signify "Jehovah is our help," but by other Hebrew scholars translated "In Jehovah's name I die.

    Under this stone rest the ashes of William Bradford a zealous Puritan & sincere Christian Gov. of Ply. Col. from 1621 to 1657, (the year he died) aged 69, except 5 yrs. which he declined.”

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

    Address: School St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 20:46:00
    Fort Hill
    41.955308°N 70.665817°W School St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Fort Hill was built by the pilgrims in 1621 as a wooden fortress to protect them against attacks by Native Americans. The pilgrims managed to place 6 cannons on Fort Hill overlooking their colony below on what is now Leyden St. (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-20 20:50:00
    Old Powder House
    41.955731°N 70.667150°W 1 m School St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: The Old Powder House was originally built in 1770. The replica was built in 1920 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the pilgrims landing at Plymouth (written by Jack Crane).

  • 2012-06-20 20:53:00
    Tabitha Plasket Grave
    41.956336°N 70.666314°W 5 m School St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Burial Hill
    Born: 1743
    Died: June 10, 1807

    Comment: Her gravestone reads: “In memory of Mrs. Tabitha Plasket who died June 10, 1807 Aged 64 years. Adieu vain world I have seen enough of the And I am careless what thou say'st of me Thy smiles I wish not; Nor thy frowns I fear, I am now at rest my head lies quiet here.”

    Address: School St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 20:57:00
    William Crowe Grave
    41.955992°N 70.665944°W

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Burial Hill
    Born: 1628
    Died: January, 1683/4

    Comment: His headstone reads: “Here lies buried ye body of Mr WILLIAM CROWE Aged About 55 years who decd January 1683/4”

    Address: School St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 21:06:00
    Edward Gray Grave
    41.955314°N 70.665617°W 7 m School St., Plymouth, MA 02360

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Burial Hill
    Born: 1629
    Died: June, 1681

    Comment: He has the oldest gravestone in Burial Hill. His gravestone states: “Here Lyeth ye Body of EDWARD GRAY Gent Aged About 52 years & Departd this life ye Last of June 1681”

    Address: School St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 21:06:00
    Watson's Hill
    41.953014°N 70.663428°W

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: On Mar. 16, 1621, the pilgrims had their first peaceful encounter with the Native Americans when Samoset showed up on Watson’s Hill and walked across Town Brook into the pilgrims’ colony.

    Description: Philbrick notes that Samoset saluted the pilgrims and said “Welcome Englishmen” which flabbergasted those present. No one could believe that a Native American spoke English. Samoset was a sachem from Pemaquid Point in Maine where he learned to speak some English from the English fishermen that began showing up in that region for the cod (the fisherman may have also been another source of the plague that hit the Native Americans so hard).

    On Mar. 22, 1621, Samoset returned with Squanto who had been captured by the English and taken to Europe where he learned to speak excellent English. Squanto desired to set up a meeting with the Pakanoket sachem Massasoit and his brother Quadequina. The brothers were close by and the pilgrims agreed to meet. Edward Winslow accompanied Squanto and Samoset as the representative of Governor John Carver. It eventually led to a treaty with Massasoit (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-20 22:18:00
    Auberge-Gladstone Guest House
    41.958864°N 70.670000°W -28 m 8 Vernon St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Hotels, bed and breakfasts, hostels, and lodges

    Size or type of room: Two rooms with a total of 2 queen-size beds and 2 pullout couches.
    Price: $320
    Rating: 1

    Comment: It was expensive, the rooms were small, old, and not well kept up. In addition, they were extremely pushy about us leaving precisely at 11 A.M. (their check-out time) and the owners were never available after our check-in time for questions about sites and reservations. There was no breakfast served with the stay.

    Date: 6/20/2012
    Address: 8 Vernon St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-20 22:43:00
    Ernie’s Restaurant
    41.974508°N 70.685808°W 330 Court St Plymouth, MA 02360

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Mushroom pizza.
    Price: $9.5
    Rating: 4

    Comment: Reasonable prices and good food.

    Date: 6/21/2012
    Address: 330 Court St.
    City: Plymouth
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02360
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 15:44:00
    Town Brook
    41.954350°N 70.664044°W Plymouth, MA 02360

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Town Brook was the major source of fresh water for the pilgrims who landed at Plymouth in 1620. At the time, the brook was full of fish particularly herring in the springtime. Squanto taught the pilgrims to use two herring as fertilize with each corn seed that was planted. Once the corn sprouted, the pilgrims planted beans and squash next to the corn which eventually grew to provide shade that kept weeds limited (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

  • 2012-06-21 16:00:00
    Milepost Restaurant and Tavern
    42.024764°N 70.697022°W 581 Tremont St., Duxbury, MA 02332

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Mushroom cheese omelet with toast and fried potatoes.
    Price: $8.95
    Rating: 4

    Comment: Reasonable prices and good food. Their ambience is exceptional.

    Date: 6/21/2012
    Address: 581 Tremont Street
    City: Duxbury
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02332
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 17:02:00
    Alden House Historic Site
    42.045283°N 70.685528°W Duxbury, MA 02332

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: John and Priscilla Alden built their first home in Plymouth Colony. But there second home was built to the southeast of the current home. There is some contention about whether they lived in the house that currently occupies the site. The current home (or at least a portion of it) was probably built sometime before John Alden died in 1687.

    Description: John and Priscilla Alden arrived in America on the Mayflower in 1620. In fact, some historians believe that John Alden was the first person from the Mayflower to set foot on what would become Plymouth Colony. Their son, Jonathan Alden inherited the home and married Abigail Hallet Alden and together lived in the home with their 6 children. In 1697, Jonathan Alden died. His eldest son, Colonel John Alden, inherited the home in 1703. He added an edition to the home in 1711. Aldens lived in the house up through 1907 when it was taken over by the Alden kindred. The kindred still runs the home today (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_and_Priscilla_Alden_Family_Sites

  • 2012-06-21 17:53:00
    Myles Standish Burying Ground
    42.025103°N 70.687408°W Chesnut St. Duxbury, MA 02332

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Comment: The cemetery claims to be the oldest maintained cemetery and was named after its most famous occupant.

    Address: Chesnut St.
    City: Duxbury
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02332
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 17:56:00
    Priscilla Alden Grave
    42.025061°N 70.687864°W Chesnut St. Duxbury, MA 02332

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Myles Standish Burying Ground
    Born: 1602, Dorking in Surrey (?), England
    Died: 1685, Duxbury, MA

    Comment: Priscilla Alden was one of the original pilgrims to sail on the Mayflower in 1620. Her parents and brother also accompanied her, but they died during the harsh first winter in Plymouth Colony. She and John Alden were one of the first couples to be married in Plymouth Colony by Governor William Bradford.
    She has gained further notoriety in a poem written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow entitled The Courtship of Myles Standish. The poem purports that Myles Standish asked John Alden to ask Priscilla to marry him and Priscilla responded “Why don’t you speak for yourself, John?”

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priscilla_Alden

    Address: Chesnut St.
    City: Duxbury
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02332
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 17:56:00
    John Alden Grave
    42.025064°N 70.687886°W Chesnut St. Duxbury, MA 02332

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Myles Standish Burying Ground
    Born: 1598, Harwich (?), England
    Died: September 12, 1687, Duxbury, MA

    Comment: John Alden was one of the original pilgrims to sail on the Mayflower. He and Priscilla Alden were one of the first couples to be married in Plymouth Colony by Governor William Bradford.
    A poem written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow entitled The Courtship of Myles Standish memorializes John Alden. Myles Standish purportedly asked John Alden to ask Priscilla to marry him. When he did, Priscilla responded “Why don’t you speak for yourself, John?”

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priscilla_Alden

    Address: Chesnut St.
    City: Duxbury
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02332
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 18:00:00
    Myles Standish Grave
    42.025278°N 70.687408°W Chesnut St. Duxbury, MA 02332

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Myles Standish Burying Ground
    Born: 1584, Lancashire (?), England
    Died: Oct. 3, 1656, Duxbury, MA

    Comment: The pilgrims hired Myles Standish as the military officer on the Mayflower and what would later become Plymouth Colony. By all accounts, he was an extremely courageous man who was instrumental in the defense of the colony particularly during their first two winters in 1620 through 1622. Standish never became a Puritan (now the Congregational Church). He was one of the early settlers of Duxbury and eventually retired there where he is now buried. He conducted several successful raids on threatening Native American tribes including the Massachusetts and Pokanoket.

    For Further Reading:
    Philbrick, N., 2006, Mayflower: A story of courage, community, and war: Penguin Books, New York, 461 p.

    Address: Chesnut St.
    City: Duxbury
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02332
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 18:38:00
    Adams Historic Site
    42.256092°N 71.010894°W 135 Adams St Quincy, MA 02170

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: The Adam’s Historic Site at this waypoint consists of the home of President John and his wife Abigail Adams and eventually became the home of their son, President John Quincy Adams and his wife.

    Description: In 1788, John and Abigail Adams moved into this home which included 75 acres about a mile from their former small farmhouse which their descendant called “Old House” at “Peace field”. John Quincy Adams inherited the home and lived there with his wife Louisa Catherine. The last Adams to live in the home was Brooks Adams who set the house up to be run by the Adams Memorial Society in 1927.
    The home contains many historical collections, and a Carriage House and Stone Library nearby. The Stone Library contains over 12,000 volumes including John Quincy Adams book collection. Unfortunately, no photographs or video are allowed to be taken inside the home or library and therefore none are included here (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    Adams, National Park Service Guide, Adams National Historical Park Massachusetts.

  • 2012-06-21 18:39:00
    John Adams Crypt
    42.251167°N 71.002764°W 1306 Hancock St. Quincy, MA 02169

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: United First Parish Church (crypt is below the church)
    Born: October 19, 1735, Braintree, MA
    Died: July 4, 1826, Quincy, MA

    Comment: John Adams was a founding father and the second president of the United States. He also served as George Washington’s vice president before he became president. He was a huge champion of independence from England and helped Thomas Jefferson write the Declaration of Independence. Adams was well educated having graduated from Harvard. He taught school shortly after he received his degree. Eventually he turned to law receiving another degree from Harvard and entering the law bar after he received he graduated.

    Adams was chosen to represent Massachusetts in the Continental Congress and was a radical supporter of a union among the colonies. After the Declaration of Independence, Adams was chosen to represent the fledging government in Europe on two occasions: 1777 and 1779. Adams returned to the US and after Independence from England he wrote the Massachusetts constitution. He stood for one term as president losing to Thomas Jefferson when he ran for a second term in 1800. He died on the countries 50th Independence Day (July 4th, 1826) the same day Thomas Jefferson passed away.

    Adams married Abigail Smith and they had six children. One of their sons, John Quincy Adams, became the sixth president of the United States.

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2001, John Adams: Simon and Schuster, 751p.

    Address: 1306 Hancock St.
    City: Quincy
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02169
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 18:50:00
    Abigail Adams Crypt
    42.251197°N 71.002781°W 1306 Hancock St. Quincy, MA 02169

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: United First Parish Church (crypt is below the church)
    Born: November 22, 1774, Weymouth, MA
    Died: October 28, 1818, Quincy, MA

    Comment: Abigail Adams was the wife of the second president of the United States, John Adams, and the mother of the sixth president of the United States, John Quincy Adams. She had six children with John Adams and is noted for her letters to her husband and the consul she gave him.

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2001, John Adams: Simon and Schuster, 751p.

    Address: 1306 Hancock St.
    City: Quincy
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02169
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 19:02:00
    John Quincy Adams Crypt
    42.251233°N 71.002797°W 1306 Hancock St. Quincy, MA 02169

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: United First Parish Church (crypt is below the church)
    Born: July 11, 1767, Braintree, MA
    Died: February 23, 1848, Washington, DC

    Comment: John Quincy Adams was the sixth president of the United States and the son of the second president, John Adams. His political career began when George Washington appointed him Minister to the Netherlands in 1794 at the age of 26 and to Portugal in 1796. When his father became president he was appointed Minister to Prussia in 1797, and about this time, he married Louisa Catherine Johnson.

    Once he returned, Adams was elected to the Massachusetts State Senate in 1802. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1803. During his time as a senator, he became a professor of rhetoric at Harvard. Once James Madison became president, Adams was appointed as the first Minister to Russia and later became the Secretary of the Cabinet under James Monroe’s presidency. And in 1825, he was elected President of the United States but lost a second term to Andrew Jackson. He returned to Massachusetts where he was elected to the United States House of Representatives. While serving on the floor of the senate he collapsed and died shortly after.

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2001, John Adams: Simon and Schuster, 751p.

    Address: 1306 Hancock St.
    City: Quincy
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02169
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 20:05:00
    Catherine Adams Crypt
    42.251267°N 71.002819°W 1 m 1306 Hancock St. Quincy, MA 02169

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: United First Parish Church (crypt is below the church)
    Born: February 12, 1775, London, England
    Died: May 15, 1852, Washington, DC

    Comment: Louisa Adams was married to John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the United States and she was the First Lady from 1825-1829.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisa_Adams

    Address: 1306 Hancock St.
    City: Quincy
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02169
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 20:34:00
    John Adams' Birthplace
    42.239319°N 71.003436°W -6 m 133 Franklin St Quincy, MA 02169

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: John Adams was born on October 19, 1735 at this location in Braintree, MA.

    Description: John Adams was a founding father and the second president of the United States. He also served as George Washington’s vice president before he became president. He was a huge champion of independence from England and helped Thomas Jefferson write the Declaration of Independence. Adams was well educated having graduated from Harvard. He taught school shortly after he received his degree. Eventually he turned to law receiving another degree from Harvard and entering the law bar after he received he graduated.

    Adams was chosen to represent Massachusetts in the Continental Congress and was a radical supporter of a union among the colonies. After the Declaration of Independence, Adams was chosen to represent the fledging government in Europe on two occasions: 1777 and 1779. Adams returned to the US and after Independence from England he wrote the Massachusetts constitution. He stood for one term as president losing to Thomas Jefferson when he ran for a second term in 1800. He died on the countries 50th Independence Day (July 4th, 1826) the same day Thomas Jefferson passed away.

    Adams married Abigail Smith and they had six children. One of their sons, John Quincy Adams, became the sixth president of the United States (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2001, John Adams: Simon and Schuster, 751p.

  • 2012-06-21 20:36:00
    John Quincy Adams' Birthplace
    42.239031°N 71.003472°W 7 m 133 Franklin St Quincy, MA 02169

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767 at this location in Braintree, MA.

    Description: John Quincy Adams was the sixth president of the United States and the son of the second president, John Adams. His political career began when George Washington appointed him Minister to the Netherlands in 1794 at the age of 26 and to Portugal in 1796. When his father became president he was appointed Minister to Prussia in 1797, and about this time, he married Louisa Catherine Johnson.

    Once he returned, Adams was elected to the Massachusetts State Senate in 1802. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1803. During his time as a senator, he became a professor of rhetoric at Harvard. Once James Madison became president, Adams was appointed as the first Minister to Russia and later became the Secretary of the Cabinet under James Monroe’s presidency. And in 1825, he was elected President of the United States but lost a second term to Andrew Jackson. He returned to Massachusetts where he was elected to the United States House of Representatives. While serving on the floor of the senate he collapsed and died shortly after (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2001, John Adams: Simon and Schuster, 751p.

  • 2012-06-21 22:15:00
    Embassy Suites Boston Waltham
    42.396364°N 71.266272°W 24 m 550 Winter St Waltham, MA 02451

    Hotels, bed and breakfasts, hostels, and lodges

    Size or type of room: Two king-size beds and an adjoining small room.
    Price: $294
    Rating: 4

    Comment: Reasonably priced, clean, and they offer a free breakfast buffet which is exceptional.

    Date: 6/21/2012
    Address: 550 Winter St.
    City: Waltham
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02451
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-21 22:36:00
    Biagio Ristorante & Bar
    42.374033°N 71.236697°W 123 Moody St Waltham, MA 02453

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Three courses – mista salad, ravioli, and tiramisu
    Price: $25
    Rating: 3

    Comment: The ambiance was superb but the service was slow and the food average. Reasonably priced.

    Date: 6/22/2012
    Address: 123 Moody St.
    City: Waltham
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02453
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-22 18:04:00
    Harvard Museum of Natural History
    42.378733°N 71.115706°W

    Museums

    Summary: The Harvard Museum of Natural History is obviously on Harvard Universities’ campus. It has several exhibits including: Fishes gallery, Mollusks: shelled masters of the marine realm, New England Forests in the Zofnass Family Gallery, Evolution, Language of Color, The Botanical Collection featuring the Glass Flowers, The Zoological Galleries which feature Arthropods: creatures that rule and the Great Mammal Hall, and the Mineralogical Galleries (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvard_Museum_of_Natural_History

  • 2012-06-22 22:24:00
    Grassfield's Food & Spirits
    42.405397°N 71.234439°W 30 m 858 Lexington St Waltham, MA 02452

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Teriyaki steak tips with salad and rice.
    Price: $14.99
    Rating: 4

    Comment: Reasonable prices and good food. It is a family-type restaurant.

    Date: 6/22/2012
    Address: 858 Lexington St.
    City: Waltham
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02452
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 04:02:00
    Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
    42.378222°N 71.114672°W Cambridge, MA 02138

    Museums

    Summary: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is located on the campus of Harvard University and consists of three floors. The first floor is related to Native American cultures, the third emphasizes Latin American cultures, and the fourth floor is dedicated to Pacific Island cultures. The link below highlights all of the various exhibits (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peabody_Museum_of_Archaeology_and_Ethnology

  • 2012-06-23 17:23:00
    Paul Revere's House
    42.363694°N 71.053647°W 16 N Square Boston, MA 02113

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: The home was built in 1680. Paul Revere owned the home from 1770 to 1800.

    Description: Paul Revere gained fame from his famous midnight ride. The British got word that guns and ammunition were being stored in Concord. On April 18, 1775, Joseph Warren discovered that British soldiers were preparing to board boats to Cambridge where they would disembark for a march to Lexington and Concord. He sent Paul Revere and William Dawes to warn the patriots that the British were coming. His intelligence also suggested that they were probably going to try and arrest John Hancock and Samuel Adams who also needed to be warned.

    Revere eventually helped Hancock to escape from the British. He was immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem Paul Revere’s Ride (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Revere_House

  • 2012-06-23 17:48:00
    Old North Church
    42.366356°N 71.054497°W 21 Hull St Boston, MA 02113

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Perhaps the most famous history concerning the Old North Church is that Paul Revere told church sexton Robert Newman and Captain John Pulling to hang two lanterns in the steeple on April 18, 1775, to warn patriots in Charlestown across the Charles River from Boston that the British were coming. Two lanterns were used to denote they were coming by water (one would have been used if they had come by land).
    Description: The church is run by the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. It was built in 1723 and is the oldest active church in Boston (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_North_Church

  • 2012-06-23 17:59:00
    Great Brinks’ Robbery
    42.367194°N 71.057894°W 0 m 282-298 Causeway St Boston, MA 02113

    Crime scenes and disaster sites

    Victim(s): Brinks
    Perpetrators: An eight-man gang led by Joseph McGinnis.
    Date: January 17, 1950
    Crime: Robbery – almost $3 million stolen

    Summary: On January 17, 1950, one man waited outside in the get-away car while seven others entered the Brinks’ building dressed as Brinks’ employees. The gang had planned the heist for 2 years acquiring keys and schedules that enabled them to surprise the five employees inside counting money. They bound and gagged them and walked away with $1,218,211.29 in cash and an additional $1,557,183.83 in securities, money orders, and checks. At the time, it was the biggest robbery in American history.

    Description: The Brinks’ building on the corner of Prince and Commercial St. has been replaced with a parking garage. But in 1950, it was a central depot for Brink’s armored trucks. Joseph “Big Joe” McGinnis conceived of the robbery and organized the gang and subsequent plan. There were very few clues in the case and, at first, nothing to lead police to the robbers.

    However, in June, 1950, two of the gang members, Joseph “Specs” O’Keefe and Stanley "Gus" Gusciora, were arrested for an unrelated robbery in Pennsylvania. They were eventually sentenced to 3 and 5 to 20 years, respectively. The FBI, through informants, began to realize that they were involved in the Brinks’ robbery but had little evidence. When O’Keefe was released from jail and the gang refused to pay him his share of the money from the Brinks robbery, he kidnapped one of the other gang members, Vincent Costa, and demanded his share as ransom. Atonia "Fat" Pino paid some of the ransom but decided it was better to kill O’Keefe. There were several failed attempts before Pino hired notorious underworld assassin Elmer "Trigger" Burke to do the job. Burke was able to shoot and seriously wound O’Keefe, but O’Keefe survived. Once he was in the hospital, FBI agents induced him to talk.

    On January 12, 1956, only 5 days before the statute of limitations was due to expire, charges were brought against the remaining gang members. They all received life sentences except O’Keefe who got six years. Astoundingly, the FBI was able to recover only $58,000 of the almost $3 million stolen.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Brink's_Robbery
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 18:36:00
    Old State House
    42.358744°N 71.057394°W 47 m

    Museums

    Summary: The Old State House was built in 1713 and served as the seat of the State legislature until 1798. It has been converted to a history museum run by the Bostonian Society. The Boston Massacre occurred in front of the building on March 5th 1770 (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_State_House_(Boston)

  • 2012-06-23 18:37:00
    Boston Massacre
    42.358772°N 71.057225°W 57 m

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: On March 5th, 1770, British soldiers fired into an unarmed crowd killing five and wounding six others.

    Description: The crowd had gathered because a British soldier, Private Hugh White, on guard duty struck a young man named Edward Garrick with the butt of his musket for insulting a British officer. The scuffle drew a rather large crowd of about 50 people including Henry Knox, just 19 years old at the time, who warned White that if he killed anyone he would die for his actions. Knox later became a general in the revolutionary war.

    Once the British got word of the incident, six privates and a non-commissioned officer were sent to support White. The soldiers took up defensive positions with loaded muskets and bayonets attached. The crowd continued to shout insults and throw items and snowballs at the soldiers taunting them to fire. Private Hugh Montgomery was struck by an object that knocked him to the ground. Witnesses state that Montgomery angrily stood and fired into the crowed which precipitated the rest of the soldiers firing (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Massacre

  • 2012-06-23 18:42:00
    Old South Meeting House
    42.357033°N 71.058478°W 114 m 11 School St Boston, MA 02108

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: The Old South Meeting House was built as a church in 1729 and served in that capacity until 1872. It was also the meeting place for the organization of the Boston Tea Party which took place on December 16, 1773 (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_South_Meeting_House

  • 2012-06-23 18:50:00
    John Winthrop Grave
    42.358261°N 71.059939°W 29 Court Square Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Kings Chapel Burial Ground
    Born: January 12, 1587 or 1588, Edwardstone, England
    Died: March 26, 1649, Boston, MA

    Comment: John Winthrop sailed to the New World in 1630 along with many other Puritans to escape the suppression of their faith by the King of England. He was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony which included the area around and from Salem to Boston, MA, and became the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Winthrop

    Address: 29 Court Square
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 18:55:00
    Mary Chilton Grave
    42.358181°N 71.060003°W 29 Court Square Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Kings Chapel Burial Ground
    Born: May 31, 1607, Sandwich, England
    Died: April, 1679, Boston, MA

    Comment: Mary Chilton may have been the first woman to step off the Mayflower in 1620 at Plymouth. Her father was the oldest member of the Mayflower and died on the voyage. Her mother passed away only eight weeks later. Either John Alden or Myles Standish raised her. When she grew up, she married John Winslow and had ten children.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Chilton

    Address: 29 Court Square
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 18:59:00
    Kings Chapel Burying Ground
    42.358317°N 71.060000°W 29 Court Square Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Comment: The Kings Chapel Burying Ground was the first cemetery in Boston opening in 1630. Some of the notable people buried in the cemetery are listed on the signs in the photograph below.

    Address: 29 Court Square
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:06:00
    Samuel Adams Grave
    42.357467°N 71.061217°W Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: September 27, 1722, Boston, MA
    Died: October 2, 1803, Boston, MA

    Comment: Samuel Adams was one of the founding fathers of the United States (and a second cousin to President John Adams). He graduated from Harvard College in 1770 and eventually entered politics. He was a major proponent of independence from Britain as a representative of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and was instrumental in setting up a network of patriots throughout the 13 colonies.

    Adams was a member of the Continental Congress and encouraged the Congress to issue the Declaration of Independence. He also helped draft the Articles of Confederation and the Massachusetts Constitution. After the revolutionary war, he became a state senator in Massachusetts and eventually the governor of Massachusetts.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Adams

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:07:00
    Victims of the Boston Massacre Grave
    42.357436°N 71.061239°W Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born:
    Died: March 5, 1770, Boston, MA

    Comment: On March 5th, 1770, British soldiers fired into an unarmed crowd killing five and wounding six others.

    The crowd had gathered because a British soldier, Private Hugh White, on guard duty struck a young man named Edward Garrick with the butt of his musket for insulting a British officer. The scuffle drew a rather large crowd of about 50 people including Henry Knox, just 19 years old at the time, who warned White that if he killed anyone he would die for his actions. Knox later became a general in the revolutionary war.

    Once the British got word of the incident, six privates and a non-commissioned officer were sent to support White. The soldiers took up defensive positions with loaded muskets and bayonets attached. The crowd continued to shout insults and throw items and snowballs at the soldiers taunting them to fire. Private Hugh Montgomery was struck by an object that knocked him to the ground. Witnesses state that Montgomery angrily stood and fired into the crowed which precipitated the rest of the soldiers firing.

    Victims:
    Samuel Gray
    Samuel Maverick
    James Caldwell
    Crispus Attucks
    Patrick Carr

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Massacre

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:08:00
    Robert Treat Paine Grave
    42.357714°N 71.061450°W Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: March 11, 1731, Boston, MA
    Died: May 11, 1814, Boston, MA

    Comment: Robert Treat Paine was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He graduated from Harvard College in 1749 and eventually became a lawyer. He was admitted to the law bar in 1757. Along with John Quincy, he prosecuted Captain Thomas Preston and the soldiers who were involved in the Boston Massacre. John Adams defended the men and most were found not guilty. Paine eventually became speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and a member of the committee that drafted the Constitution of the United States. He also served as Massachusetts Attorney General from 1770 to 1790. Finally, he was appointed to the Massachusetts Supreme Court where he retired in 1804.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Treat_Paine

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:17:00
    Mary Goose Grave
    42.357633°N 71.061822°W 26 m Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: 1690
    Died: about 1648

    Comment: There is a belief (probably incorrect) that Mary Goose buried in the Granary Burying Ground was Mother Goose the author of nursery rhymes and fairy tales.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother_Goose

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:23:00
    Paul Revere Grave
    42.357583°N 71.062119°W 14 m Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: December 21, 1724, Boston, MA
    Died: May 10, 1818, Boston, MA

    Comment: Paul Revere gained fame from his famous midnight ride. The British got word that guns and ammunition were being stored in Concord. On April 18, 1775, Joseph Warren discovered that British soldiers were preparing to board boats to Cambridge where they would disembark for a march to Lexington and Concord. He sent Paul Revere and William Dawes to warn the patriots that the British were coming. His intelligence also suggested that they were probably going to try and arrest John Hancock and Samuel Adams who also needed to be warned.

    Revere eventually helped Hancock to escape from the British. He was immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem Paul Revere’s Ride.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Revere

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:27:00
    John Hancock Grave
    42.357206°N 71.062197°W 24 m Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: January 23, 1737, Braintree, MA
    Died: October 8, 1793

    Comment: John Hancock is probably most noted for the size and prominence of his signature on the Declaration of Independence. He was also the first Governor or Massachusetts and later became the third Governor. John Hancock inherited extreme wealth from his uncle and was one of the wealthiest men in the colonies. He served two years on the Continental Congress (he was President of the Congress when the Declaration was signed) and used much of his personal wealth to help the patriot cause against Britain.

    In 1768, John Hancock was accused of smuggling and his ship the Liberty was boarded and ceased. The action made him quite popular among patriots and eventually the charges were dropped. On April 14th, 1775, General Thomas Gage was instructed to send troops out to confiscate arms and attempt to arrest John Hancock and Samuel Adams. Hancock was intimately involved in governance during the revolution and even commanded 6,000 men in an attack on a British garrison in Newport, RI in 1778 although he left the details of the attack to the officers. When the war ended, Hancock settled into politics particularly related to the governing Massachusetts.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hancock

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:30:00
    John Phillips Grave
    42.357639°N 71.061258°W 18 m Tremont St. Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: November 26, 1770
    Died: May 29, 1823

    Comment: John Phillips was the first mayor of Boston.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Phillips_(mayor)

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:32:00
    Granary Burying Ground
    42.357231°N 71.061394°W 5 m Tremont St Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Comment: The cemetery was established in 1660 and is most noted for the large number of revolutionary war patriots buried on the grounds. Some of the notable graves in the cemetery are listed on the sign in the photograph.

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 19:39:00
    Peter Faneuil Grave
    42.357456°N 71.062383°W Tremont St. Boston, MA 02108

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Granary Burying Ground
    Born: June 20, 1700, New Rochelle, NY
    Died: March 3, 1743, Boston, MA

    Comment: Peter Faneuil is primarily noted for donating Faneuil Hall to Boston which became a large market building. He made his fortune as merchant primarily shipping slaves to the West Indies and shipping back sugar cane products.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Faneuil

    Address: Tremont St.
    City: Boston
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02108
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-23 20:42:00
    Battle of Bunker Hill
    42.376367°N 71.060736°W 11 m 8 Monument Square Charlestown, MA 02129

    Battlefields and memorials

    Summary: The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on June 17, 1775 and the monument commemorating the battle is actually on Breed’s Hill where most of the fighting took place.

    Description: In an effort to gain the high ground during the Siege of Boston early in the Revolutionary War, the colonial army sent 1,200 men under the command of William Prescott to secretly occupy and fortify Breed’s and Bunker Hills on June 13, 1775. They constructed a particularly impressive redoubt on Breed’s Hill. When the British realized the colonials had secured the hills, they attacked being repulsed two times before a third assault succeeded in taking Breed’s Hill primarily because the colonials ran out of ammunition. The colonials retreated via Bunker Hill to Cambridge.

    Although the British rightfully claimed a victory their casualties were extraordinarily high. There were 226 soldiers killed and 828 more suffered wounds (nearly a third of the British forces in Boston). Some 140 colonials were killed (many retreating over Bunker Hill) and 310 wounded (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bunker_Hill

  • 2012-06-23 21:15:00
    Dorchester Heights Fortification
    42.332844°N 71.045758°W 18 m Boston, MA 02127

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Colonel Henry Knox (later Brigadier General and First Secretary of War) brought canons from Ticonderoga -- which had been captured by the colonials under Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold -- and snuck them up on top of the heights without the British knowing it. The threat of being bombarded by cannon ended the Siege of Boston when the British gave up the city during the early part of the Revolutionary War.

    Description: On the night of March 4, 1776, under the command of General George Washington the Continental Army stealthily took control of Dorchester Heights with its spectacular view of Boston below. General William Howe and the British in Boston awoke the next morning to find heavy cannon and fortifications had been aligned against him. At first Howe wanted to attack the Heights, but the casualties incurred taking Breed’s and Bunker Hills made him eventually realize that the cost would be too high. Admiral Shuldham pointed out that he needed to move the British fleet if the Heights could not be taken, because they were in danger of being destroyed by the cannon fire. Howe sent a message to Washington informing him that Boston would not be burnt to the ground if the British were allowed to leave Boston without bombardment. On March 17, the British along with loyalists left Boston Harbor on the British fleet (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776: Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-23 22:58:00
    Solea Restaurant & Tapas Bar
    42.369544°N 71.237056°W -6 m 388 Moody St Waltham, MA 02453

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Three Tapas - Empanadas (beef), beef tenderloin with spicy sauce, and grilled chicken
    Price: Empanadas = $8, beef = $9.5, and the grilled chicken = $9.5
    Rating: 5

    Comment: Superb Spanish cuisine (the owners are from Spain). Interior was nice and service was fine.

    Date: 6/23/2012
    Address: 388 Moody St.
    City: Waltham
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02453
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-24 16:55:00
    Longfellow's Wayside Inn Grist Mill
    42.357219°N 71.473906°W

    Scenic views and attractions

    Summary: Longfellow's Wayside Inn Grist Mill was funded by Henry Ford and constructed in 1929 by J.B. Campbell. Pepperidge Farm used the mill for flour production from 1952 to 1967 and the grist mill was the foundation for the company logo (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayside_Inn

  • 2012-06-24 17:34:00
    Longfellow’s Wayside Inn
    42.357328°N 71.469086°W 42 m

    Scenic views and attractions

    Summary: Longfellow’s Wayside Inn is claimed to be the oldest operating inn in the United States. It was constructed in 1716 as Howe’s Tavern (written by Jack Crane).
    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayside_Inn

  • 2012-06-24 18:48:00
    Henry David Thoreau's Cabin Site
    42.442061°N 71.342531°W 36 m

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: Henry David Thoreau built the cabin on July 14th, 1845 where he lived for two and a half years on Walden Pond. He later wrote a book called Walden based on his experiences and thoughts while living there.

    Description: Henry David Thoreau was fundamentally a naturalist and endeavored to take himself back to nature on the land that Ralph Waldo Emerson owned on Walden Pond. He wrote the first draft of A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers while living on Walden Pond about his brother’s trip to the White Mountains. On September 6th, 1847, he left his cabin and went to live in Emerson’s home which was only 1.5 miles away. In 1854, he published Walden about his life in the cabin and on the lake. The book was condensed into 1 year even though Walden lived in the cabin for more than two years.

    Thoreau worked in his family’s pencil factory for most of his life and later became involved in the abolitionist movement. He wrote his essay entitled Civil Disobedience in May, 1849 partly in response to running in to the tax collector in 1846 while he was living on Walden Pond. He was asked to pay six years of delinquent poll tax but refused based primarily on his objection to the Mexican-American War. His refusal cost him a night in jail until his aunt paid the taxes much to his chagrin (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau

  • 2012-06-24 19:29:00
    Ralph Waldo Emerson House
    42.457678°N 72.338611°W 17 m Cambridge Turnpike Concord, MA 01742

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: Ralph Waldo Emerson’s house was built in 1828 and is currently a museum. Emerson moved into the home with his new bride, Lydia, on September 15, 1835 and lived there until he died in 1882. Henry David Thoreau lived in the home on two different occasions (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Waldo_Emerson_House

  • 2012-06-24 19:49:00
    Henry David Thoreau Grave
    42.464714°N 71.342422°W 11 m Bedford St. Concord, MA 01742

    Cemeteries and grave sites


    Cemetery: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery
    Born: July 12, 1817, Concord, MA
    Died: May 6, 1862, Concord, MA

    Comment: Henry David Thoreau was fundamentally a naturalist and endeavored to take himself back to nature on the land that Ralph Waldo Emerson owned on Walden Pond. He wrote the first draft of A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers while living on Walden Pond about his brother’s trip to the White Mountains. On September 6th, 1847, he left his cabin and went to live in Emerson’s home which was only 1.5 miles away. In 1854, he published Walden about his life in the cabin and on the lake. The book was condensed into 1 year even though Walden lived in the cabin for more than two years.

    Thoreau worked in his family’s pencil factory for most of his life and later became involved in the abolitionist movement. He wrote his essay entitled Civil Disobedience in May, 1849 partly in response to running in to the tax collector in 1846 while he was living on Walden Pond. He was asked to pay six years of delinquent poll tax but refused based primarily on his objection to the Mexican-American War. His refusal cost him a night in jail until his aunt paid the taxes much to his chagrin.

    Thoreau contracted tuberculosis and eventually bronchitis and died at the young age of 44.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau

    Address: Bedford St.
    City: Concord
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02742
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-24 19:51:00
    Ralph Waldo Emerson Grave
    42.464719°N 71.341656°W 16 m Bedford St Concord, MA 01742

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery
    Born: May 25, 1803, Boston, MA
    Died: April 27, 1882, Concord, MA

    Comment: Ralph Waldo Emerson graduated from Harvard College in 1821. He returned to Harvard Divinity School where he graduated first in his class. Afterwards, Daniel Webster hired him in his law firm. But he was ordained a pastor in 1829 and went to work at the Boston’s Second Church. Disagreements with the church, led him eventually to buy a home in Concord, MA, and marry a second time to Lydia Jackson (his first wife died young).

    Emerson was a major force behind the philosophical movement Transcendentalism which believed in the inherent good of humans and nature. He started the Transcendental Club which met in his home beginning in 1836. Noteworthy members included Margaret Fuller, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, and many others. About this time, he published an essay entitled Nature anonymously. In 1841, he followed with a book entitled Essays which included his now famous article Self Reliance which received good reviews. By this time, Emerson reputation enabled him to earn a fair living as a lecturer. Like many of the others within his circle, he was an abolitionist but was reluctant to address the issue in his lectures shunning public attention.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Waldo_Emerson

    Address: Bedford St.
    City: Concord
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02742
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-24 19:54:00
    Louisa May Alcott Grave
    42.464736°N 71.342469°W 25 m Bedford St. Concord, MA 01742

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery
    Born: November 29, 1832, Germantown, PA
    Died: March 6, 1888, Boston, MA

    Comment: When Louisa May Alcott was a young child, her parents moved to Concord, MA. Through her parents she came to know Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller. When she became an adult, she was firm abolitionist and feminist. In 1860, Alcott began getting articles published in The Atlantic Monthly and during the Civil War worked as a nurse in a hospital in Washington, DC.

    Alcott gained her primary fame from her semiautobiographical novel Little Women which was written in 1868. She followed the book with part 2 entitled Good Wives in 1869. She never married even though Jo, a character in her books based loosely on herself, married.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisa_May_Alcott

    Address: Bedford St.
    City: Concord
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02742
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-24 19:55:00
    Nathaniel Hawthorne Grave
    42.465022°N 71.342494°W 30 m Bedford St. Concord, MA 01742

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Author’s Ridge: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery
    Born: July 4, 1804, Salem, MA
    Died: May 19, 1864, Plymouth, NH

    Comment: Nathaniel Hawthorne was a descendent of Judge John Hathorne who was known for presiding over the Salem witch trials. The stigma attached to these scandalous events prompted Nathanial Hawthorne to add the letter “w” to his name in order to further remove himself from any connection with the judge. Hawthorne was noted for his short stories as well as novels and the biography of Franklin Pierce, who was a personal friend of Hawthorn’s. They met at a stage stop on Hawthorn’s way to Bowdoin College years before Pierce became president. Among his most renowned works are The Scarlet Letter, The House of Seven Gables, The Blithedale Romance, and The Marble Faun.

    Hawthorne attended Bowdoin College from 1821 to 1825 and became a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Before his writing career became a reliable source of income he worked at the Boston Custom House. With the sole intention of saving money on lodging he joined the transcendentalist movement at Brook Farm. By 1842, he was earning enough as a writer to marry his fiancée of four years, Sophia Peabody, and move to Concord. Eventually they bought Amos Bronson Alcott’s (Louisa May Alcott’s father) home and named it The Wayside.

    The Hawthornes were extremely shy and embraced a life style of relative seclusion. They had three children. Their daughter Una was born in 1844 followed by the birth of their son Julian in 1846, and finally their youngest child, a daughter named Rose, born in 1851.
    Upon Franklin Pierce’s election as president, Hawthorn was appointed as the United States Consul of Liverpool in 1853. This lucrative position was terminated in 1857 at the end of Pierce’s presidency, but the Hawthorne family remained in Europe traveling through Italy and France. They returned to Wayside in 1860.

    The onset of the Civil War created much personal turmoil for Hawthorne and greatly interfered with his writing. Thus he, along with publisher William D. Ticknor, embarked on a trip to Washington D.C to gain more insight into the ramifications and business of war. There he met Major General George B. McClellan and President Abraham Lincoln. These meetings inspired his essay written in 1862, Chiefly About War Matters.

    Stomach problems plagued Hawthorn in his final days. He took what he thought might be a recuperative trip to the White Mountains with Franklin Peirce, but Nathanial died in his sleep while on the trip.
    Hawthorne’s pallbearers were Longfellow, Emerson, Holmes, Alcott, James Thomas Fields, and Edwin Percy Whipple.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Hawthorne

    Address: Bedford St.
    City: Concord
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02742
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-24 19:59:00
    Sleepy Hollow Cemetery
    42.463831°N 71.340169°W 27 m Bedford St Concord, MA 01742

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Comment: The cemetery includes an area termed “author hill” where Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau are buried.

    Address: Bedford St.
    City: Concord
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02453
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-24 20:07:00
    Battle at North Bridge, Concord
    42.468992°N 71.350633°W

    Battlefields and memorials

    Summary: North Bridge in Concord, MA, was the most westerly position the British army achieved during the battles of Lexington and Concord. A small group of British regulars secured the bridge but panicked when they saw the Minutemen firing on them. Two were killed and four were wounded. The Minutemen returned fire and killed 3 British soldiers and wounded 13 others. The British ran from the position to escape entrapment.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776, Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-24 20:53:00
    Meriam's Corner Skirmish
    42.446975°N 71.230308°W 22 m Minute Man National Historical Park Concord, MA 01742

    Battlefields and memorials

    Summary: Summary: The British were in retreat by now after the Battle of North Bridge fighting a running battle to return to Boston. They met Minutemen as they tried to cross a small bridge over Mill Brook near the Meriam home along what is now referred to as Battle Road. The bridge forced a bottleneck because the number of soldiers that could cross was limited. From Miriam’s home, the Colonial Army opened fire on the soldiers killing two.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776, Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-24 21:08:00
    Battle of Lexington
    42.449225°N 71.230308°W 70 m Massachusetts Ave Lexington, MA 02421

    Battlefields and memorials

    Summary: On the morning of April 19, 1775, about 80 colonials exited nearby Buckman Tavern and met the British at Lexington Common (sometimes refer to as Lexington Green). They were led by Captain John Parker. No doubt the first shot of the Revolutionary War was fired here, but it is not known by whom. Once the first shot was fired, it precipitated a round of blasts which killed eight of the colonial militia and wounded ten more. Only one British regular was wounded. It can hardly be called a battle, but was to mark the beginning of a long day of fighting between the British and Colonial Army.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1,000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776, Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-24 21:16:00
    Buckman Tavern
    42.449394°N 71.229683°W 54 m Bedford St Lexington, MA 02421

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Buckman Tavern was built in 1690. It became a favorite respite for the militia training on Lexington Common (also known as Lexington Green) in preparation for any action required against the British. When Paul Revere brought word of the British coming, many men gathered in the tavern to await their arrival. Captain Parker was in command on the morning of April 19, 1775, when the British arrived. The men left the tavern and formed up on Lexington Common into two ranks. The first shot of the Revolutionary War was fired and the skirmish that followed killed eight militia and wounded ten others. Only one British soldier was wounded.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1,000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776, Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-24 21:39:00
    Hancock-Clarke House
    42.453561°N 71.228531°W 69 m Hancock St Lexington, MA 02420

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: On the eve of the Revolutionary War on April 18, 1775, Paul Revere and William Dawes were sent to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams of the approaching British troops. Hancock and Adams hid in the Hancock-Clark house from the British after attending the meeting of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress. The home belonged to Reverend Clarke at the time. Clarke was pastor at the Church of Christ in Lexington, MA, and was married to Hancock’s cousin Lucy Bowes Clarke. The home had previously been owned by Hancock’s grandfather who was the reverend of the Church of Christ prior to Clarke. Hancock lived here with his grandfather after his father’s death in 1744. In 1750, John moved to Boston to live with his wealthy uncle who later adopted John (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hancock-Clarke_House

  • 2012-06-24 21:59:00
    Site of the Capture of Paul Revere
    42.448917°N 71.279769°W 10 m

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: The site of the capture of Paul Revere is in Minuteman National Historic Park. Paul Revere left Boston on April 18, 1775, to warn the countryside that the British were coming to confiscate arms and to possible attempt to capture John Hancock and Samuel Adams. At about 10:00 P.M. he reached Lexington where he had meetings with Hancock and Adams along with other militia. He eventually went on to warn Concord but was captured by a British patrol at a road block here. They probed Revere at gunpoint with questions and Revere told them that if they approached Lexington they would be overrun by the numbers of militia forming. Despite the warnings, the soldiers marched on toward Lexington. As they approached, a bell began to ring alerting the area that the British were approaching. The British decided to head back to the main column and free the prisoners. They kept Revere’s horse. He made his way by foot to the Hancock-Clark house where he met up with Hancock and Adams.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1,000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Revere
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776, Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-24 22:10:00
    Hartwell Tavern
    42.453808°N 71.293178°W 33 m Minute Man National Historical Park Lincoln, MA 01773

    Historic places and sites

    Summary: Hartwell Tavern is located along Battle Road Trail in Minuteman National Historic Park. It is a restored home and tavern that was built in 1732. At the time of the Concord and Lexington battles on April 19, 1775 the home was owned by Ephraim and Elizabeth Hartwell. Three of their sons were involved in the skirmishes along Battle Road Trail.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1,000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.nps.gov/mima/hartwell-tavern.htm

  • 2012-06-24 22:16:00
    Battle of Bloody Angle
    42.455336°N 71.297969°W 49 m Minute Man National Historical Park Lincoln, MA 01773

    Battlefields and memorials

    Summary: Bloody Angle was the largest battle of the Lexington and Concord skirmishes. While British forces were retreating from Concord, 200 well concealed Minutemen opened fire on them at this curve in what is referred to now as Battle Trail Road in Minuteman National Historical Park. Estimates place the British dead at 30 while the Minutemen lost only 4 men. By the time the British made it through Bloody Angle, more than 2,000 Minutemen and Colonial soldiers had amassed in the area. It could have been much worse for the British had it not been for the arrival of Earl Percy's rescue force of about 1,000 men sent from Boston by General Thomas Gage.

    Description: On April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith with about 700 regulars from Boston to confiscate guns and ammunition rumored to be in Concord. The Revolutionary War began at Lexington on April 19th, 1775, when a small skirmish broke out between patriots and Colonel Smith’s men. Smith continued to move on toward Concord where they located a few cannon buried by the Colonial Army.

    Colonel James Barrett commander of the Colonial Army with only 250 men surrendered the town of Concord to the approaching British and set up defenses outside of town on hills to the west of North Bridge. Smith ordered Captain Parsons to secure North Bridge while other British regulars searched the town. By the time the bridge was secured, Minutemen from around the countryside were swarming into the ranks of the Colonial Army after word spread of the fighting. There were more than 400 of them at North Bridge by the time the first shots were fired. The British decided to retreat back to Boston.

    Near Meriam's Corner (named after the nearby Miriam home), the ranks of the Minutemen had swelled to more than 1,000 as news of the Lexington and North Bridge engagements spread. Fighting at Meriam’s Corner resulted in 2 British regulars killed and 6 more wounded. When the British had retreated to a point now referred to as Bloody Angel, they met more than 200 Minutemen from Bedford and Lincoln well hidden behind trees and walls along the road. They caught the British in a classic crossfire killing about 30 British soldiers while losing only 4 Minutemen. The British soldiers broke into a fast jog and escaped because the Colonials could not keep up in the swamps and brush. There were additional skirmishes all along the route back toward Boston.

    By this time, Gage received messages that his troops were under attack and sent more than a 1,000 regulars under the command of Earl Percy in support of Smith. Once Percy reached Smith’s men around Lexington he assumed command and marched back to Cambridge under continued harassment from Colonials. Meanwhile, Brigadier General William Heath arrived to take charge of the Colonial Army and instructed his men to attack from concealed positions and not engage directly (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    McCullough, D., 2006, 1776, Simon and Schuster, 400p.

  • 2012-06-24 22:40:00
    Panera Bread (Lexington)
    42.446703°N 71.226186°W 11 m 1684 Massachusetts Ave Lexington, MA 02420

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Smoked ham and cheese sandwich.
    Price: $6.29
    Rating: 3

    Comment: I generally like Panera Bread but I did not like this sandwich.

    Date: 6//2012
    Address: 1684 Massachusetts Ave
    City: Lexington
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02420
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-25 19:18:00
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    42.359756°N 71.092339°W 4 m

    Schools, Colleges, Universities, and Research Centers

    Summary: Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a private university with an emphasis on research in science, technology and mathematics. It is located in Cambridge Massachusetts, USA.

    Description: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1861 with an emphasis on applied technology and basic science research and was elected to The Association of American Universities in 1934. The 160 acre campus opened in 1916 in Cambridge Massachusetts; one mile of which borders the Charles River. Within the five schools and one college at MIT there are 32 departments. Numerous Nobel Laureates, National Medal of Science recipients, Rhodes Scholars, and MacArthur Fellows are currently on the faculty or have been on the faculty at MIT in the past. Among some of the Nobel Laureates affiliated with MIT are Luis Alverez, Richard Fieyman, Mario Molina, George Smoot, and Steven Weinberg.

    MIT students are known for pulling harmless pranks on their own campus or on rival universities. One of these pranks, which are also referred to at MIT as hacks, happened in April, 2012, when the earth and planetary science building became an enormous Tetris game. The windows on the outside of the building would light up in different colors and could be controlled by a console on the grounds in front of the building. Students could actually play Tetris with the windows of the building. Another such hack occurred at Harvard’s stadium during the Harvard/Yale football game in 2000 when stuffed beavers were dropped from a balloons overhead. The beaver is MIT’s mascot because the beaver is the natural engineer (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_Institute_of_Technology

  • 2012-06-26 15:23:00
    Boston University
    42.359756°N 71.092339°W -2 m

    Schools, Colleges, Universities, and Research Centers

    Summary: Boston University is one of the United States’ largest private research universities. It is located in Cambridge Massachusetts.

    Description: Boston University (BU) established in 1839 is a private nonsectarian university, but has a historical affiliation with the United Methodist Church. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education identifies BU as a university with very high research activity. The University is also a member of the Consortium for Higher Education. There have been 7 Nobel Prize Laureates, 22 Pulitzer Prize Winners, and many Guggenheim and MacArthur fellows associated with Boston University as either faculty or alumni. Martin Luther King Jr. was among their Nobel Prize Laureates (PhD, 1955).

    Boston University consists of 18 schools and colleges on two campuses with the main campus located on the Charles River. The university has undergraduate, masters, and doctorate programs as well as medical and dental schools. BU also offers study abroad programs in over 20 countries.

    Boston University has won five national championships in men’s hockey with Rhett the Boston Terrier as their mascot. Among other cultural opportunities at BU is the Huntington Theatre Company which performs in the 890 seat theatre on BU’s campus, and the university’s three art galleries which host displays of many visiting artist’s work (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_University

  • 2012-06-26 15:36:00
    21 Movie Location – Mugar Memorial Library
    42.350992°N 71.107861°W

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 2008
    Major Actors: Jim Sturgess, Kevin Spacey, and Kate Bosworth
    Director: Robert Luketic

    Scene Description of Location: Ben (Sturgess) studies (practices counting cards) in the basement of the Mugar Memorial Library.

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0478087/

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-26 15:55:00
    21 Movie Location – College of Arts and Science
    42.350133°N 71.104547°W

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 2008
    Major Actors: Jim Sturgess, Kevin Spacey, and Kate Bosworth
    Director: Robert Luketic

    Scene Description of Location: There are several shots in the long corridor of the College of Arts and Sciences (see image below).

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0478087/

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-26 16:10:00
    21 Movie Location – The Towers
    42.350042°N 71.099750°W 4 m 147 Bay State Rd Boston, MA 02215

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 2008
    Major Actors: Jim Sturgess, Kevin Spacey, and Kate Bosworth
    Director: Robert Luketic

    Scene Description of Location: Ben (Sturgess) has a room in The Towers and the front of the building (see image below) is shown in the movie also.

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0478087/

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-26 18:10:00
    Boston Common
    42.354908°N 71.065889°W

    Municipal parks and plazas

    Summary: Boston Common is considered the oldest park in the United States and dates back to 1634. Several historically interesting events have occurred in the park over the years. The British Regulars used it as an encampment during the Revolutionary War. It was also the site of public hangings until 1817. Mary Dyer, a Puritan, was hanged in 1660 for preaching Quakerism. On June 19th, 1656, Ann Hibbins was hung on Boston Commons for practicing witchcraft. In 1969, a Vietnam War protest drew more than 100,000 people. Martin Luther King Jr. and Pope John Paul II have presented speeches in the park and on August 31, 1967, Judy Garland gave her biggest concert ever on Boston Common. The park has a strict curfew because on August 27, 2007 two teenagers were struck with bullets from a gun fired in the park (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Common

  • 2012-06-26 18:23:00
    Good Will Hunting Movie Location – Public Garden (Boston)
    42.354461°N 71.070622°W Boston, MA 02116

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 1997
    Major Actors: Matt Damon, Robin Williams, Ben Affleck, and Stellan Skarsgård
    Director: Gus Van Sant

    Scene Description of Location: The Scene with Will (Damon) and Sean (Williams) was shot on a bench along the pond in the Public Gardens of Boston. The precise location of the bench is difficult to determine because some of the Gardens have changed since 1997. But the location given here is believed to be close to where the scene was filmed.

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119217/

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-26 18:56:00
    Public Garden (Boston)
    42.354042°N 71.070125°W

    Municipal parks and plazas

    Summary: Boston Garden is next to Boston Common and was established in 1837. The park was designed by George F. Meacham (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Garden_(Boston)

  • 2012-06-26 19:06:00
    Masschusetts State House
    42.358217°N 71.063689°W -9 m Freedom Trail Boston, MA 02108

    Government buildings

    Summary: The State House is located across the street from Boston Common on Beacon Street. It is the state capital and was built in 1798 on land originally owned by John Hancock; the first elected governor of Massachusetts. The building was designed by Charles Bullfinch and sits on top of Beacon Hill. The east and west wings were added in 1917. The architects for these additions were Sturgis, Chapman and Andrews.

    In order to stop the dome from leaking it was covered with sheets of copper in 1802 by Paul Revere’s company. The dome was later gilded with gold leaf in 1874. A pinecone tops the dome symbolizing Boston’s lumber business during the late eighteenth century. There is a wooden cod that hangs in the House of Representatives chamber given to the house by a merchant in 1784. This is known as the “sacred cod” and symbolizes the importance of the fishing industry in Massachusetts. Murals decorating the second floor under the dome were painted by Edward Brodney who won a contest to paint the first mural in 1936. He painted the second mural in 1938 (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_State_House

  • 2012-06-26 20:55:00
    John F. Kennedy Birthplace
    42.347067°N 71.123456°W

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: The birthplace of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, is located at 83 Beals St. Brookline Mass. He lived there until he was three years old. Today it is a museum open to the public.

    Description: Joseph and Rose Kennedy bought the home in 1914 just after they were married. They lived there until 1920 when the growing family needed more space (they moved to a larger home a few blocks away on the corner of Abbottsford and Naples). At the time, Joseph Kennedy was president of the Columbia Trust Bank, and he used a new Model T Ford to commute to work. Rose was in walking distance of the shopping district. Two of the Kennedy girls, Rosemary and Kathleen, were also born in the house, but the Kennedy' oldest child Joe was born in Hull, MA, while the couple was on vacation.

    After JFK’s death, the Kennedy family bought the house from its private owner in order to restore it to its 1917 appearance and turn it into a memorial to JFK. Rose Kennedy worked with an interior decorator using period antiques and some original family artifacts to make the home look as she remembered it during John’s early childhood. Some of the many artifacts include Rose’s wedding china, her children’s christening cap and gown, and some of their toys and books. Two of John’s favorite childhood books are there; King Arthur and His Knights, and Billy Whiskers and His Kids. In 1967, Rose donated the house to the National Park Service. It is open to the public for guided and self guided tours (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Fitzgerald_Kennedy_National_Historic_Site

  • 2012-06-27 15:41:00
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Grave
    42.373572°N 71.143128°W 7 m 580 Mount Auburn St., Cambridge, MA 02472

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: February 27, 1807, Portland, ME
    Died: March 24, 1882, Cambridge, MA

    Comment: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was primarily an American poet. Some of his notable works include The Ride of Paul Revere, The Courtship of Miles Standish and Other Poems, The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He received a degree from Bowdoin College and eventually taught there and then at Harvard College. His first wife, Mary Storer Potter, died of complications from a pregnancy in 1831. As a young man, he rented the home that George Washington lived in during the Siege of Boston. He later purchased the home where he lived with his second wife, Frances Fanny Appleton. They had six children but in 1861 tragedy struck. While collecting locks of her children’s hair and sealing them in envelops, her dress caught on fire and she died from the burns. He retired in 1854 to concentrate on his writing and died in 1882 of a stomach ailment.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wadsworth_Longfellow

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 15:44:00
    James Russell Lowell Grave
    42.373731°N 71.143008°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: February 22, 1819, Cambridge, MA
    Died: August 12, 1891, Cambridge, MA

    Comment: The American romantic Poet Lowell was one of the first to rival the popular British poets. Although Lowell had many other publications throughout his career, in 1848, he published two of his most famous works: A Fable for Critics and The Biglow Papers. In 1838, Lowell graduated from Harvard College and then earned his law degree from Harvard Law School. Lowell was very involved with the anti-slavery movement and worked as the editor of an abolitionist newspaper in Philadelphia PA. He used his poetry to express his opinions on slavery. In 1856, Lowell took the position of Smith Professorship of Modern Languages at Harvard College and remained there for twenty years.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Russell_Lowell

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 15:54:00
    Oliver Wendel Holmes Sr. Grave
    42.372475°N 71.141439°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: August 28, 1809, Cambridge, MA
    Died: October 7, 1894, Cambridge, MA

    Comment: Holmes was a contemporary and friend of writers such as Emerson, Longfellow, and Lowell. He was a physician and lecturer as well as a writer spending much of his career teaching at Dartmouth Medical School and Harvard. Some of his most famous written works were The Breakfast Table Series and Old Ironsides. He was also published in the Atlantic Monthly which he founded.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Wendell_Holmes,_Sr.

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:09:00
    Richard Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller Grave
    42.369803°N 71.145814°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: July 12, 1895, Milton, MA
    Died: July 1, 1983, Los Angeles, CA

    Comment: Richard Buckminster was an inventor, architect, engineer, author, and systems theorist. He published more than 30 books and developed many inventions. Some of his best known inventions are the light weight, stable structure called the geodesic dome, the dymaxion house which was invented to be energy efficient and inexpensive, and the dymaxion car which was to be safer. One famous example of his geodesic dome is the Spaceship Earth building at Epcot, Walt Disney World.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:12:00
    Charles Bulfinch Grave
    42.369792°N 71.145861°W 9 m 580 Mount Auburn St., Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: August 8, 1763, Boston, MA
    Died: April 15, 1844, Boston, MA

    Comment: Charles Bulfinch was one of the first American architects. He completed his education at Harvard College with a Master’s degree in 1784. He traveled Europe from 1785 to 1787 where he developed an appreciation for classical architecture in Italy and neo classical architecture in England. He married Hanna Apthorp in 1788 and later had two sons: Thomas Bulfinch and Stephen Greenleaf Bulfinch.

    Among some of his better known buildings and designs were the United States Capitol rotunda and dome, the Old State House in Hartford Conn., the Massachusetts State House, the Hollis Street Church and the New North Church in Boston, the memorial column on Beacon Hill, the Federal Street Theatre, the Tontine Crescent, the design of Boston Common, the India Wharf, the Meeting House in Lancaster MA and University Hall at Harvard. He designed, built, and constructed many other buildings and houses.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bulfinch

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:16:00
    Louis Agassiz Grave
    42.369644°N 71.146389°W 14 m 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: May 28, 1807, Môtier, Switzerland
    Died: December 14, 1873, Cambridge, MA

    Comment: Louis Agassiz was born in Switzerland and educated in Switzerland and Germany. He studied Natural History with an emphasis on botany. He earned a degree in philosophy and then in medicine. Finally in Paris, he studied zoology, geology, and ichthyology. In 1832, he became a professor of Natural History at the University of Neuchatel. He did extensive research on the fresh water fish of central Europe. Agassiz is most noted for his proposal that the earth had once been subjected to an ice age. At the time, it was extremely controversial but we now know that the earth has had many episodes of glaciations. During the years 1842-1846 he worked on and published a classified list of all names employed in zoology for genera and groups. In 1846, after giving a series of lectures at the Lowell Institute in Boston, MA, he was elected as a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was instrumental in the establishment and became the head of the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard and in 1859, he founded the Museum of Comparative Zoology.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Agassiz

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:22:00
    McGeorge Bundy Grave
    42.370086°N 71.145522°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: March 30, 1919, Boston, MA
    Died: September 16, 1996, New York, NY

    Comment: McGeorge Bundy, also known as “Mac”, was appointed United States National Security Advisor by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 and continued on with President Lyndon B. Johnson until February 1966. Bundy was a professor of government at Harvard University, and in 1953 was appointed Harvard’s dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Among Bundy’s prestigious honors was his 1954 election as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and receiving the Presidential Medal Of Freedom in 1969. He made a major career change in 1966 taking on the position of president of the Ford Foundation from 1966 to 1979.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McGeorge_Bundy

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:36:00
    B. F. Skinner Grave
    42.368714°N 71.146739°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: March 20, 1904, Susquehanna, PA
    Died: August 18, 1990, Cambridge, MA

    Comment: Burrhus Frederic Skinner was named the top influential psychologists of the twentieth century in a 2002 survey published in the Review of General Psychology. He was an American psychologist who spent most of his career teaching and researching at Harvard University’s Department of Psychology having published 21 books and 180 articles. Skinner invented the Operant Conditioning Chamber (Skinner Box) which he used in his behavioral analysis experiments by way of a reward or punishment.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._F._Skinner

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:46:00
    Asa Gray Grave
    42.371278°N 71.143986°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: November 18, 1810, Sauquoit, NY
    Died: January 30, 1888, Cambridge, MA

    Comment: Asa Gray was the most well renowned American botanist of the 19th century. He was influenced by Darwin and published many works such as Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States, from England to Wisconsin and South to Ohio and Pennsylvania inclusive, and also The Flora of North America, and Elements of Botany. Gray was a professor of natural history at Harvard University from 1842 to 1873. In 1859, he was elected as a foreign member of The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Gray donated his extraordinary and extensive collection of books and plant samples to Harvard University.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asa_Gray

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 16:54:00
    Mary Baker Eddy Grave
    42.373781°N 71.140600°W 580 Mount Auburn St. Cambridge, MA 02138

    Cemeteries and grave sites

    Cemetery: Mount Auburn Cemetery
    Born: July 16, 1821, Bow, NH
    Died: December 3, 1910, Newton, MA

    Comment: Mary Baker Eddy was the founder of Christian Science (1879), a religion that rejects medicine and hygiene and relies on spiritual healing instead. Having been sickly most of her life she spent much of her time searching for what she thought would be beneficial to her own state of health and eventually established a church which emphasized healing through prayer. In 1898, she founded the Christian Science Publishing Society which published the daily newspaper The Christian Science Monitor, a seven time Pulitzer Prize winning publication. She also founded the monthly magazine Christian Science Journal, the weekly periodical Christian Science Sentinel, and the Herald of Christian Science which is published in many languages.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Baker_Eddy

    Address: 580 Mount Auburn St.
    City: Cambridge
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02138
    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 17:07:00
    Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site
    42.376892°N 71.126411°W 105 Brattle St Longfellow Home Cambridge, MA 02138

    Famous and/or historical homes

    Summary: The Longfellow house is located at 105 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA. It was used as George Washington’s Headquarters during the beginning of the Revolutionary War and later became the home of poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

    Description: The Longfellow house was built in 1759 and was originally owned by John Vassall. Vassall was a loyalist and thus returned to England after the onset of the Revolutionary War. George Washington, the commander and chief of the Colonial Army, set up his military head quarters in the abandoned house and remained there throughout the beginning of the war until the British left Boston in July, 1776. His wife Martha lived there with him from December, 1775 until March, 1776. Washington met with and entertained many important officials in the house. Among them were John and Abigail Adams, Benedict Arnold, Henry Knox, and Nathaniel Greene.

    Washington’s Apothecary General, Andrew Craigie, purchased the home in 1791. After his death his wife Elizabeth rented out rooms to borders. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow first came to the home as a border early in his career as a poet and Harvard professor. When he first approached Mrs. Craigie about renting a room she refused him, because she did not believe that he was actually a professor, and she did not rent rooms to students. Finally Longfellow was able to convince her that he was indeed a poet and professor when he told her that he was the author of the book she was reading.

    After Elizabeth Craigie’s death Longfellow’s future father in law, Nathan Appleton, bought the house and gave it to Longfellow and his daughter Frances as a wedding gift. The Longfellow’s lived in the house for the rest of their lives (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longfellow_House%E2%80%93Washington's_Headquarters_National_Historic_Site

  • 2012-06-27 18:53:00
    Cheers Film Location – The Bull and Finch Pub
    42.355889°N 71.071239°W 84 Beacon St Boston, MA 02108

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 1982 - 1993
    Major Actors: Ted Danson, Shelly Long, Kristy Alley, Woody Harrelson, John Ratzenberger, George Wendt, Kelsey Grammer, Rhea Perlman, and Bebe Neuwirth.
    Creators: James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles

    Scene Description of Location: The Bull and Finch Pub was used as the exterior location of the mythic Cheers bar. It was chosen out of the phone book at random. The bar is currently called Cheers, Beacon Hill, but the interior of the bar does not resemble the one used in the series which was a set location.

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheers

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 19:51:00
    Good Will Hunting Movie Location – L St. Tavern
    42.331558°N 71.035322°W -9 m 186 L St Boston, MA 02127

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 1997
    Major Actors: Matt Damon, Robin Williams, Ben Affleck, and Stellan Skarsgård
    Director: Gus Van Sant

    Scene Description of Location: Woody’s L St. Tavern is where Will (Damon) hangs out with his “Southie” friends such as Chuckie Sullivan (Affleck). If you go into the bar, you will be able to see the precise table where the scenes were shot. Pictures from the movie also decorate the bar.

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119217/

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-27 20:10:00
    John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum
    42.316039°N 71.033525°W Columbia Point University of Massachusetts Boston Boston, MA 02125

    Museums

    Summary: The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum houses original papers and correspondences of the Kennedy Administration. It is located in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, MA. The library is not open to the public, but the museum, which houses many exhibits, is.

    Description: A committee of friends and family worked with Jacqueline Kennedy to select an architect for the presidential library shortly after President Kennedy’s death. After much deliberation over the selection of an architect I. M. Pei was chosen. Mrs. Kennedy said she felt a personal connection with him and that “he was so full of promise like Jack”. Pei worked closely with Jacqueline Kennedy and the Kennedy family on the design and construction of the Library and Museum. After numerous delays and a change in location the library and museum was finally completed and dedicated by President Jimmy Carter in 1979. It was only the fifth Presidential Library in existence at the time of its completion. (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy_Presidential_Library_and_Museum

  • 2012-06-28 15:28:00
    Harvard University
    42.374314°N 71.116436°W Cambridge, MA 02138

    Schools, Colleges, Universities, and Research Centers

    Summary: Harvard University is a private research university within the Ivy League. It is located in Cambridge, MA, approximately 3.4 miles northwest of Boston.

    Description: Harvard is the oldest institution for higher learning in the United States, established in 1636. It is also the oldest corporation in the country. It was named after John Harvard, the university’s first benefactor, who donated his personal library of 400 books and 779 pounds sterling.

    Harvard offers 46 undergraduate degrees, 134 graduate degrees, and 32 professional degrees. Eight U.S. presidents are among Harvard’s alumni, and there have been 75 Nobel Laureates associated with the university as either faculty or alumni. Harvard has the largest academic library in the U.S. and the world’s largest university endowment. Harvard also competes in 41 sports in the NCAA Division 1 Ivy League.

    The main campus is 210 acres surrounding Harvard Yard in Cambridge. The business school is located on a 359 acre campus in Allston. Harvard’s stadium and other athletic facilities are located at the Allston campus as well. The medical and dental schools and The Harvard School of Public Health are located in the 22 acre Longwood Medical and Academic Area which is 3.3 miles south of the Cambridge campus.

    Harvard is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges with the focus of instruction emphasizing the arts and sciences (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvard_University

  • 2012-06-28 16:51:00
    Good Will Hunting Movie Location – Au Bon Pain
    42.373175°N 71.118622°W 8 m Massachusetts Ave Cambridge, MA 02138

    Film and movie locations

    Date of Filming: 1997
    Major Actors: Matt Damon, Robin Williams, Ben Affleck, and Stellan Skarsgård
    Director: Gus Van Sant

    Scene Description of Location: Will (Damon) speaks with his girlfriend for an extended period of time at the Au Bon Pain café in the outside dining area in the center toward the street. The café is located in Harvard Square.

    For Further Reading:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119217/

    Contributor: Jack Crane

  • 2012-06-28 17:48:00
    MIT Museum
    42.362039°N 71.097647°W 27 Front St Cambridge, MA 02139

    Museums

    Summary: The MIT Museum is located in Cambridge Mass. It was established in 1971 to showcase scientific and technological discoveries related to Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as artifacts related to the history of the Institute. The first floor has displays related to a wide variety of scientific fields as well as a gift and book shop. The larger second floor displays a vast array of robotics, machines, computers, videos, holographs, Lisp Machine and artificial intelligence artifacts, and Bernice Abbott’s photographs of discoveries in physics.

    Description: The museum offers hands on activities, demonstrations, and tours as well as self-guided touring of the exhibits. The museum also sponsors a multi-day science festival during April with numerous activities, performances, and a carnival. The museum also hosts an annual family event where teams each build a machine in a Rube Goldberg style. The day culminates with the machines all being linked together to create a chain reaction. This event is known as F.A.T.; the acronym for Friday After Thanksgiving.
    The MIT museum offers something for all ages, exhibiting scientific and technological discoveries from the past and inspiring innovative thinking for the future (written by Jack Crane).

    For Further Reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIT_Museum

  • 2012-06-28 23:43:00
    Lexx Restaurant
    42.446519°N 71.225686°W 26 m 1666 Massachusetts Ave Lexington, MA 02420

    Restaurants

    Food ordered: Pork Ossu buco
    Price: $22
    Rating: 4

    Comment: Quite nice with good ambiance.

    Date: 6/28/2012
    Address: 1666 Massachusetts Ave # 102
    City: Lexington
    State: MA
    Zipcode: 02420
    Contributor: Jack Crane